Category Archives: running

Three strikes you’re out or third times a charm?

I received my Ride the Rockies swag in the mail. A cool t-shirt and hat as well as a sticker and some kind of yay you’re doing this insane ride promotional  card. I enjoy the freebies and souvenirs of events I enter, but I never wear the stuff until after I finish. Why would I walk around saying I ran this or that if I haven’t yet? And yet—the promotional card for RtR clearly states, wear this hat! Wear this t-shirt! Tell everyone you know that you and 2000 of your closest friends will be participating in this 7 day 465 scenic wonder that IS Ride the Rockies!

I woke up this morning to 36ºF and snow on the ground and promptly returned to bed. I rode my bike outside 16 miles once earlier this month and cannot in good conscience, start wearing that damned, taunting swag until I at LEAST ride 20!

Do you wear your swag before you participate in the event?

Riding Outdoors? Not me. Not yet.

I confess. I have no athletic goals for 2014. Well, that’s not exactly true. I’ve signed up for some things, but I haven’t been “training” specifically for anything. Nada. Nil. Nothing. Honestly, after leaving Ride The Rockies early last summer due to my mom’s battle with Multiple Myeloma, I’ve been slightly distracted. It’s amazing what happens when a family member takes ill. Everything else falls by the wayside, including caring for myself. Last fall, when my mom was hospitalized, I had been running 7 miles and had signed up for the Soldier Field 10 Mile Race for May 2014 and hoped to beat my last run from 2011. Well, I’m currently building my base back up at 2-3 miles because I haven’t run regularly since October. Everyone says you have to take care of yourself when you’re in a crisis mode for someone else, but that is easier said than done. I could not even think about myself when my mom was in the hospital. It felt selfish and a waste of time since I could be with her and talk to doctors. But it’s true. You have to take care of yourself because you need to be strong for the person you’re caring for. In December, I started riding on the trainer indoors and running on the treadmill but nowhere near the amount or regularity one needs to adequately participate in an race.

So what did I do? I signed up with my husband to ride a century for Tour de Cure for the American Diabetes Foundation. I get an early season goal to achieve and raise money for a good cause that effects 26 million people. SO—if you’d like to contribute to Tour De Cure please follow this link http://tour.diabetes.org/site/TR?px=9905620&pg=personal&fr_id=9382&s_src=email_tour&s_subsrc=autoresponder-forward. I truly appreciate it.

Never say never or people will call you names

Sometimes I wonder why I run and bike. Usually, this happens when I’m alone on a path or street, trying to maintain a specific zone or cadence and ignoring the voice in my head suggesting I turn around because it’s too hard or that I slow down because it’s windy. My fitness relies on goals. Whether it’s a race or specific improvement or just maintenance, I need goals, or I can think of hundreds of activities to pass the time besides working out.

In December, my mom was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, which according to the Mayo Clinic is, “… a cancer of your plasma cells, a type of white blood cell present in your bone marrow.” While there is no cure currently, there are many treatments and luckily, she was treated early and has responded very well. Things are ok with her. She leads a busy life and has an amazing, positive attitude. The thing is, it REALLY prioritized my goals when my mom, who I have always viewed as indestructible, in the short span of weeks prior to her diagnosis, suddenly became wracked with pain and bed-ridden, taking on physical attributes more commonly associated with my late  90+ grandma. Yes, things are much better now, but it was breath-taking to experience (and not the beautiful vista kind of “breath-taking” but rather the kind where you actually feel your breath being taken away). I kept picturing a ladder where my mom became my grandma, and I became my mom, and we kept climbing up.

This mental image brought into a very clear focus why I ride and run, why I choose to torture my body in the name of physical and mental fitness.   I do this because I don’t want to climb that ladder, or if time must pass and the climb is inevitable, I at least would like to slow the climb and enjoy with gratitude every step and rung along the way.

Three years ago, my husband and I signed up for Ride the Rockies bike tour and raised over $3,000 for the Livestrong Foundation. We knew several people suffering from various cancers and in my perpetual guilt/gratitude, I needed to give something back for the fact that my family and I are healthy, happy, and able to have this adventure.

From March 2010 to June, I rode over 700 base miles in training. In Colorado, I rode over 500 miles in one week and climbed thousands of feet in elevation. Ride the Rockies was the hardest task I ever accomplished. There is no way to train for the elevation or climbs living in Chicago, but I did it. I also didn’t realize the mental workout a ride like that would take on my head. I was terrified of the descents and pissed my climbing was so slow. What most people had said was great fun was utterly grueling and made me feel that whatever fitness level I had in Chicago utterly vanished in Colorado.  So, I came home, promised myself that I’d never do that again, and I set other fitness goals for myself (mostly running).

Well, self, I’m doing it again.

And, the reaction that I get when I tell my non-cycling friends is, “Ilyse. You said you’d never do that again.” Or, “Are you #@?!ing crazy?”  Honestly, the reaction that I get from many of my cycling friends isn’t really that much different..  Apparently, I am a crazy hypocrite, but yes, I’m doing it again, and here’s why. I’d like to do it a little better than I did in 2010, and even if that doesn’t happen, mentally, I’m more aware of what to expect and hope even if my legs fail me, my head won’t.

So it’s off to Denver in June right after my 8th grader graduates from middle school. I will miss his 14th birthday because I’ll be riding. He said that he totally understands because he loves his grandma, and I’m riding for a good cause (see below). I’ll be riding on my husband’s birthday and mine as well. I like the idea of climbing up a mountain on my 45th birthday. I’m not so sure about riding down it. We’ll see how it goes.

More importantly, I am raising money for the Multiple Myeloma Foundation and am riding in hopes of a cure for my mom as well as the other millions of people who suffer from this disease. If you want to help by making a donation, that would be great. I truly appreciate it. You can click the link below. Thank you.

Please click on the link which will take you directly to the site.

Better late than not at all

Today I went a little out of my box and am the better person for it. I got an email about Danny Abshire running a workshop at a local Tri shop near my house. Ok, the truth is you could win a free pair of Newton running shoes, and I thought, well gee whiz, I could use a new pair of those! Anyway, I wear Newtons, and I like them very much. So I figured, what they hey? Why not go check it out.

Although I didn’t know anyone and kinda felt like an awkward 13 year old walking into a new school, I forced myself to make small talk and hoped the shmoozing would be quick. Danny was extremely friendly and really talked about the basics of foot strike, gait and running form. Honestly, I’ve never had anyone assess my form in person, so I was curious as to getting a professional opinion. We all sampled the 2013 Newton Gravity shoes which had a different feel than my 2011 Newton stability shoes. I was pleased when one of his assistants inspected the bottoms of my shoes and said I must have great form since I’m running them down in all the right places.

There were about 25 people and he took us outside to a parking lot to teach us a few drills focusing on form and efficient running. I know I have a mid-foot strike, but I’ll tell you, to hear how great my form is from professional kinda validates me. I never thought about running at 180 beats per minute and coordinating the timing with drills was easier than I expected. It was also VERY effective. I can be a shuffler at times, and as soon as he said lift up my knees just a half inch, it made all the difference in the world.

Although I didn’t even win a visor not to mention the swanky sneaks, the drills were invaluable, and it was nice to get out of my daily routine and try something different. I even went home and ran outside which I haven’t done the entire winter. Better late then not at all!